Pastoral Care
Pastoral Care Team 2017
Paul English Coordinator Tel: 4321 6405 Email Terase Killin Counsellor Tel: 4321 6411 Email Geraldine Tague Counsellor Tel: 4321 6412 Email Robert Speziale Year 12 Coordinator Tel: 4321 6410 Email Stephen Carrol Year 11 Coordinator Tel: 4321 6407 Email Michael Gill Year 10 Coordinator Tel: 4321 6409 Email Eamonn McCauley Year 9 Coordinator Tel: 4321 6406 Email Scott Beattie Year 8 Coordinator Tel: 4321 6413 Email Wendy Taylor Year 7 Coordinator Tel: 4321 6408 Email  
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Student Welfare
"If students are feeling well, if they are functioning well, if they are coping well with the stresses that are around them; they’re better able to take on new information and obviously achieve well in school."  Professor Donna Cross is Foundation Professor of Child and Adolescent Health at the Child Health Promotion Research Centre, University of Western Australia. The following list is drawn from the experiences of many teenagers and young adults who have worked with counsellors in a variety of situations – schools, TAFE colleges, community health centres, telephone help lines and internet youth counselling services. It covers some of the worries that young people have from time to time. Behaviour at school Behaviour at home Making and keeping friends; friendship groups Boy/girl relationships Family relationships (communication, trust, separation, divorce) Progress at school; changing schools, leaving school Loss and bereavement Inappropriate use of drugs, including tobacco and alcohol Physical changes of puberty Emotional issues (anger, anxiety, loneliness, depression) If these are some of the things that worry you from time to time, or if you have other concerns, it would be a good idea to talk them over on a one-to-one basis with a trusted adult. That person could be a parent, relative, sports coach, teacher or counsellor. The College counsellors are available to you during school hours and may be able to help you work through your worries before they become major problems. Support Information Lifeline (24 hrs) – Ph: 13 11 14 www.lifeline.org.au Kids Helpline (24 hrs) – Ph: 1800 551 800 www.kidshelp.com.au Youth Beyond Blue – Ph: 1300 22 4636 www.youthbeyondblue.com Reach Out Australia – www.reachout.com Beyond Blue – 1300 224 636 www.beyondblue.org.au Black Dog Institute - (02) 9382 4530 www.blackdoginstitute.org.au eHeadspace – 11800 650 890 www.eheadspace.org.au [Parent Forum Transcript] [Suicide in Schools Parent Information]
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Counsellors
Located within the Pastoral Care area, there are two Counsellors available for consultation with students and their parents/caregivers.  The Counsellors have undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications and many years experience working in schools and in private practice with adolescents and other age groups.  They are both accredited members of professional bodies and adhere to professional ethical standards. Holistic Approach The College Charter has themes of education as being a liberating force in raising awareness of self and others in the world. Other themes include the theme of being an inclusive community, spirituality as fostering compassion, justice and peace and standing together in solidarity on issues that are committed to the universal good of our planet.  The College Counsellors are also committed to the values in the Charter and consider the social, cultural, environmental, emotional, physical and psychological aspects of each individual student in the development of their sense of self, resilience, and sense of self-control. How To Access the Counsellors Students are able to make an appointment with a Counsellor directly, or by one of the referrals which are located on either of the Counsellor’s doors, Students are also able to self-refer by emailing the Counsellors indicating when they are available for an appointment.  Counsellors’ emails are read mainly within the school term. During holiday periods, if students need to access the Counsellors, emails may be sent to the website’s bully box which are read within 48 hours by Mr Paul English, Pastoral Care Co-ordinator. Mr English will endeavour to discuss the request with the Counsellors.  Of course, in holidays or after hours, should an urgent situation arise a phone call should be made to the Mental Health Line, 1800 011 511 which is a 24 hour crisis line.  Other ways to access the Counsellors include speaking with Year Co-ordinators, or the Pastoral Care Co-ordinator, who will liaise with the Counsellors.  Additionally, parents/caregivers can phone the Counsellors directly to refer their child if they have concerns or, alternatively, they can phone the Pastoral Care Co-ordinator or Year Co-ordinators. Why Talk to a Counsellor Everyone faces challenges, predicaments and worries throughout their lives and may feel the need to express their concerns in a private and non-judgemental environment in which they feel empowered, validated and respected.  Sometimes a student may only feel that one or two sessions is enough to address an issue and sometimes it may be longer. Both the St Edward's College Counsellors have vast knowledge and experience with a number of therapies, strategies and counselling practices that deal with a wide range of issues faced by secondary students and their families/caregivers.  Counselling is seen as an integral part of school life and every student has the opportunity to access counselling and support when needed, whether short or long term. When to Talk to a Counsellor It is a good idea to have a chat with a Counsellor when you know you are not functioning like you  usually do.  That is, when you feel overwhelmed that things are piling up on top of you and you start to: Want to stay in bed all day/don’t want to go out of your bedroom Have disruptive sleep patterns…wake up for no reason for hours during the night Can’t get to sleep Isolate from friends Lose your appetite Feeling like having a shower is just so hard Fun seems like a remote idea Generally feel low/depressed Is Counselling Private and Confidential The sessions between a Counsellor and a student is private and confidential.  The only information that must be passed on, according to the Law, is information about a student who has been harmed or who expresses an intention to harm himself or someone else.  If it is OK with the student to let his teachers know of his present circumstances, the Counsellors may act as Advocates for the student and work closely with teachers to support the student. Common Issues Some of the common issues dealt with in counselling include: Mental Health concerns:  e.g. anxiety, depression Friendship/relationship stresses and/or skill building Family illness/disruption/relationship stress Grief and Loss Adjustment to High School Bullying – restorative justice sessions/working with the Year Co-ordinator Anger – constructive vs destructive Trauma counselling Life coaching for older students
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Formation of Students
St Edward’s College adopted the theme “Where Young Men Achieve” under the guidance of the then principal Br Peter Hester. The six tiered formation process is designed to give substance to this theme. The formation process links, from year to year, the development and growth of the students in our care at the College. They enter as boys, fresh from seven years of primary education, and leave six years later as educated young men who are ready to be active within the wider community, displaying a strong sense of purpose. The six themes are based around concepts of growth and awareness so students appreciate that they belong to a community which is rich in history and strong in values. Ultimately, when students finish their six years at the College, they are prepared academically and socially to enter the workforce as young men who are willing to contribute to the community. The formation process has the following themes: Year 7 – Belonging Year 8 – Values and Service Year 9 – Men of Honour Year 10 – Leadership and Involvement Year 11 – Owning the Responsibility Year 12 – Young Men with Purpose Year 7 welcomes the students into the community of St Edward’s.  It is based around the recognition of belonging to the College community.  It incorporates teaching the students the history of Edmund Rice and the story of the Christian Brothers. It is here that we introduce the touchstones which are integral to all EREA schools in our region.  We also recognise the St Edward’s College ‘Code for Learning’ which incorporates the everyday activities of our College. Year 8 introduces the Waterford Project which instills values of service and acceptance. Bullying issues within school and the wider community are presented in classes, and educating boys in ‘right versus wrong’ is incorporated into daily teaching. Year 9 promotes the idea of being gentlemen within society. Boys have a strong sense of justice at this age, however we encourage them to extend their horizons beyond their own personal space. Standing up for injustice, recognizing cultural diversity and acknowledging the equality of the sexes in our society are major issues that will be profiled. Year 10 introduces the leadership programme and highlights the transition into the senior school. Involvement in Leadership Prefect portfolios is encouraged and leadership is acknowledged through the badging of College Leaders in second semester. Involvement will be mandatory for those students who have ambitions of being a Prefect in their final years. Leadership is seen both in and out of the classroom and involvement in all facets of College life can be developed weekly. Year 11 focusses on owning the responsibility of the senior years at the College. The process of goal setting for individual pathways is closely linked to leadership.  Boys are encouraged to set personal standards in behaviour and a strong presence around the College is expected. Owning responsibility and consequences that come with emerging self-identity are developed.  Academic and career choices will be the focus, as will continued involvement in Prefect Leadership Portfolios. Year 12 is the final step in our formation process. Leadership can be handed over and focus can be on individual pathways and academia. Young Men with Purpose is the theme for Year 12 and purpose is defined as “with intention and determination”. All facets of College life are undertaken with intention and determination. It is here the boys graduate as young men who have achieved to the best of their ability during their time at the College.
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Student Rights and Responsibilities
1. To be able to learn and participate fully in all classes and activities To try my best To pay attention in class To be involved in school activities To develop my skills with the help of my teachers Never to miss school or lessons without permission To be on time for class and all school activities To always be in the right place at the right time To bring the necessary books and equipment to class To complete all my set work and not to disturb the work of others 2. To enjoy a clean attractive environment To look after school furniture and property To put rubbish in bins To keep classrooms clean and tidy To take good care of textbooks and library books To keep desks, walls and pin boards free of graffiti Not to eat or drink in classrooms or the Edmund Rice Centre 3. To have a good school name To wear my uniform with pride To behave well at all times To show respect to visitors To display good sportsmanship 4. To be in a safe well ordered environment To have my diary with me during lessons To follow teachers’ directions regarding the use of equipment and facilities To move in an orderly manner, keeping to the left of stairways and verandahs To get on/off buses safely and waiting for the bus to stop To listen for bells and move when I should To report to Administration if I am late for school To stay away from out of bounds areas To bring absentee notes to Tutors To return all borrowed equipment 5. To be treated with respect, understanding and courtesy To be supportive of others To be friendly and helpful To respect a person’s good name To treat other people with respect To express different opinions politely To listen to the other point of view To co-operate with teachers by helping when asked 6. To have my property respected To take care of my possessions To take care of other people’s books, bags etc To ask before borrowing and return borrowed items promptly To leave other people’s possessions alone Not to write on other people’s belongings 7. To share a just and honest environment Don’t steal Don’t lie Don’t cheat Do not accept lying, stealing or cheating by others Don’t use offensive language
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School Rules
Respect for Ourselves Work to the best of my ability and hand in all work on time Be in the right place at the right time Be punctual and attend all classes/activities Have all necessary equipment, including a diary and PE uniform Wear the correct uniform at all times Respect for Others Be well mannered at all times Solve differences without abuse, either verbal or physical Do not prevent others from learning Move around the school in a quiet, safe and orderly manner Respect for Property and the Environment Do not litter, steal or vandalize Do not eat or drink in the classroom Punctuality and Absence Students are expected to be on time for school. When a student is late, they must bring a note explaining the reason for the lateness and hand it in at the Office where a Late Pass will be issued which will then be shown to the class teacher. When a student is absent, he should bring an absentee note on the day of his return and give it to his Tutor. Leave Pass Students who need to leave the College due to an appointment must obtain a leave pass from the Pastoral Care Coordinator before school. A letter of explanation needs to be presented. The pass is then presented to the office where the Office staff will sign the student out. Uniform Pass A uniform slip needs to be obtained from the Pastoral Care Coordinator when full uniform cannot be worn. A letter of explanation needs to be presented. On Fridays, if full sports uniform cannot be worn, a student needs to wear his normal uniform to school and get changed at the venue. Out of Bounds Some areas of the school have been declared as ‘out of bounds’ and students are not permitted in these areas. A classroom without a teacher Stairwells and verandahs (in wet weather the verandahs may be used) The area around Mona Vale, in front of the ERC, all roads, doors/stairwells or other areas marked with a yellow line The oval and basketball courts before and after school The bush area around the oval Afternoon Buses Students are to assemble on the basketball courts to catch afternoon buses. When their bus arrives they are to line up in the appropriate lines from where the teachers will supervise boarding. Students are not permitted to leave this area while waiting for buses. Transport Behaviour Students are expected to be courteous to the driver and passengers on the bus and should not force others to give up their seats. Passes should be shown on boarding and may not be lent to another student. Students should be settled on buses and not be rowdy. Students are not permitted to get off the bus before it reaches the College in the morning. Personal Property Valuable items, including large sums of money, should be handed into the Office. Wallets should be carried on one’s person and not left in bags. The following are banned from the College: Jewellery (except watches) Chewing gum Cigarettes, matches, lighters Alcohol or drugs (except medication) Knives, blades or other dangerous items Graffiti or its implements Skateboards/scooters Students are discouraged from bringing mobile phones, personal stereos and the like and no responsibility is taken by the College for loss or damage. Games Games are only to be played on the oval or basketball courts, except handball, which may be played in the quadrangle. All games are non-contact. Food is not permitted on the oval. Textbooks Students are responsible for all textbooks issued to them and should not lend them to anyone. The student must pay for lost or damaged books. Books needing repair are to be taken to the Bookroom. Students with overdue textbooks will not be issued with any books until the book(s) is (are) returned. Mobile Phones/Personal Stereos Students are allowed to use phones/iPods as a tool to assist them in their day to day schooling. They are able to use these devices, if they have the appropriate technology, to check timetables, access student files, record daily home study requirements or any teacher directed applications. Technology should be placed on the students desk and be visible to the teacher at all times during class. If parents wish to phone students during school time, they must phone the school and the student will be given the message. If a student is ill, they should report to the College Office, who will evaluate the situation and contact parents or carers by the College telephone. Students should not independently contact parents about an illness or any incident. The duty of care the College has with all students requires that messages to parents go via College staff. If students need to contact parents or carers for other reasons during school time they should see their Year Coordinator and they will be allowed to phone/ text in the Pastoral Care area. The College Insurance does not cover the loss, the theft or damage to such digital devices and this fact is to be advertised in the first Newsletter of the year, which will also be used to discourage bringing them to school, unless absolutely essential.
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Bullying
Bullying is defined as “any action or implied action, such as threats of violence, intended to cause fear or distress”. In the words of students at St Edward’s College “it is giving someone a hard time for no specific or apparent reason”. Such bullying can be emotional, verbal and/or physical. It can be subtle or obvious, and can occur once or over a period of time. Whatever form the bullying takes it utilises the illegitimate use of power in order to hurt others. Examples of bullying are threats of violence, actual physical violence or intimidation, verbal malice, exclusion of the victim and harassment (including sexual or racial). Students may be skilled in bullying behaviours such as fighting, manipulating or intimidating. Others may be skilled in those behaviours associated with being a victim, such as attention seeking, over sensitivity and the inability to have their needs met. In both categories students are often inadequate in the socially desirable behaviours, such as negotiating differences, dealing with conflict, responding to failure, responding appropriately to stressful situations, to rejection, peer pressure and anger. This policy is designed in response to the understanding that bullying has painful consequences for the victim and also subsequently for the classroom environment and the College’s learning culture. This is because a student’s feeling of safety and their ability to learn is affected by the power struggles within the school environment. This policy acknowledges that early intervention to address bullying behaviours may reduce the incidence of anti-social behaviours in adulthood. Research has shown that taking two important steps can reduce bullying: Creating an active, practical policy; Openly discussing bullying (silence and secrecy nurture bullying). To find out more download the Safe School Procedure Flowchart | PDF 16KB The Proactive Process Staff will actively supervise students in all school activities. The College’s attitude to bullies will be communicated to boys’ on a regular basis through College Assemblies. The rights and responsibilities of the College Community are published and supported. Students are urged to report bullying to the appropriate people. This can be verbal or by using the College email The College also surveys various year groups regarding bullying throughout the year. Reporting Bullying Behaviour Students report the behaviour to the tutor, another teacher, directly to a member of the Pastoral Care Team or through the College website. When bullying is reported the following may occur: Peer conferencing between the victim, support person/s, the bully/bullies and supporting teacher Follow up by the supporting teacher Contact with the parents of the victim and the bully If the bullying is repeated, intervention by the Pastoral Care Coordinator
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Home Study Statement
Homework refers to all work teachers expect students to do out of school hours, i.e., assignments, daily homework, preparation for tests, reading of set texts, study for examinations etc. Educational research indicates that homework has an important role to play in the learning process. Teachers at St Edward’s College set a variety of homework ranging from homework to be completed in one night, work to be completed over a few nights, to longer assignments requiring two or more weeks to complete. Aims of Homework Homework at St Edward’s College has its goals: to reinforce, consolidate and improve skills taught in class, to encourage good study habits, to develop self discipline and independent learning, and to extend students beyond the work normally taught in class. Amount of Homework Given to Students The amount of homework given to students will vary from teacher to teacher and subject to subject. Some subjects lend themselves more easily to homework, especially homework that can be completed overnight. Note: the total time spent in homework over a week for a student in Year 7 should not exceed 6 hours. Parents are encouraged to contact the teacher of a given subject if they have concerns about the amount homework (too much or too little) being set for their son. Non-Completion of Homework If students consistently fail to complete homework, teachers will usually contact parents by letter, phone or a note in the student’s book. Prior to contacting parents, teachers use a variety of techniques to encourage students to complete homework. For example, providing time in school hours (eg at lunch) where some or all homework can be completed or imposing a school service penalty on the student.  
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Level System
Teachers use their own systems of rewards and punishments within the classroom and the schoolyard situation. They also make use of the College’s own system as a more formalised procedure. The Level System, which applies to Years 7-12, acknowledges and rewards student’s achievements in relation to Behaviour, Service to the College and Academic/Effort. The System makes them responsible and answerable for behaviour that is not acceptable in the College. Corporal punishment is not an acceptable form of discipline and, as such, is prohibited at school.   Each of the Pastoral Levels brings responsibilities as outlined: Level 3 Entry Working well in a number of subjects and behaviour is good in most aspects of school life. Level 2 Silver Working well in all subjects and behaviour is very good in all aspects of school life. Level 1 Gold Works well in all subjects and can be relied upon to do what is correct at all times.   Students may change one Level at a time. At the end of the College year students on Levels 1 and 2 will move back one Level and will need to attain the various certificates again in order to move again to the highest Level Gold. Gold students will only need to attain 1 Silver Certificate in the areas of Service and Academic/Effort in order to move back to Level 1 Gold. Students who finish the year on either Level 4 or 5 may negotiate with their Year Coordinator their return to Level 3 to commence the New Year. Students on Levels 1-3 who misbehave move back ONE Level and receive the normal punishment for their misbehaviour. Any Level 1-3 student who is suspended due to timeout or detention will automatically drop a Level. If they are on Level 1 or 2 and are sent to timeout more than once per term, they may drop a Level if the Year Coordinator deems it necessary. These students return to a higher Level via the usual procedure that may include successful completion of monitoring sheets or attainment of certificates.
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Senior Students
Senior students as older members of the College have increased freedoms but also increased responsibilities. All senior students are expected to be appropriate role models for younger students. There are a number of different opportunities for senior students to demonstrate leadership. This might be as a designated College Leader, a member of a Prefect portfolio or as a College Prefect. All senior leadership roles have as their basis the following: The appropriate wearing of the College uniform, at school, travelling to and from school, in public places and for school events; Modelling of appropriate behaviour at school and travelling to and from school; Demonstrating an appropriate work ethic and application to their studies; An ongoing commitment to the College’s justice and peace program; Active supervision of younger students when travelling; A commitment to meeting the expectations of the role description for their leadership position. College Leader All year 10, 11 and 12 students are entitled to apply for this position if they feel they can fulfil the requirements of the role description. In addition to the above they are expected to assist the Tutor Teacher in the administrative duties and pastoral care of younger students. This could take the form of mentoring younger students in the Tutor class. Prefect Prefects undertake to show leadership in a particular area of College life. Typically these could be: Sport; Liturgies and Assemblies; Social Justice; the Environment; Technology; Publicity; Creative Arts and Social Activities. Each area might have two or three Prefects taking a leadership role. Prefects also represent the College in the public arena where they may attend events like Citizenship Ceremonies. The College Captain and Vice Captain(s) are chosen from the Prefect group. The prefect group is normally about fourteen students.
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